Friday, July 10, 2009

Buddhist, Christian Dialogue in Barnes and Noble

While at a local bookstore, I noticed that the all-important philosophy section had moved. But I could not find it. So, I asked a salesperson where it was. As she guided me there, I said, "Just when you think you really know a bookstore, it changes." She replied, "That's an object lesson in Buddhism: everything is impermanent." After a pause, I said, "Well, not everything is impermanent." She said, "Name one thing that is not impermanent." "God," I announced. She said, "Well, you are right about that."

5 comments:

David Strunk said...

This seems more like a lesson in the fact that people hold unexamined and internally inconsistent views as it relates to their worldview.

Furthermore, the very fact that anyone could be right about anything at all at any point would seem to refute the entire idea of impermenance altogether. Being right, by its very nature, suggests permenance of thought.

Paul said...

Moreover, most Buddhists are atheistic, so how can you be right about a property of a non-entity?

Mike said...

You could rather say that impermanence is a constant, or an inherent law designed into the Creation. Eastern religions are adept at recognizing these, but they tend to get complacently stuck there.

mark mathewson said...

Speaking of Buddhism, I highly recommend Harold Netland and Keith Yandells' recent book on Buddhism (IVP). Quality stuff.

Doug Groothuis said...

I have that book, Mark; hope to read it soon. Am working hard on finishing my long-overdue apologetics book, What Matters Most (IVP).